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Programme - 2012 Global Ethics Forum, 28-30 June 2012

Speakers List - 2012 Global Ethics Forum

News and Media Releases

28.06.2013: Inequalities block poverty reduction and economic development, Global Ethics Forum told

 

30.06.2012: Global business model needs paradigm shift to embrace values, says corporate governance expert

30.06.2012: Greater efforts required to 'mainstream' economic and environmental sustainability

29.06.2012: World debt and financial crisis 'needs new  reserve currency system'

28.06.2012: Global governance cooperation urgent, says top Swiss development official

28.06.2012: Launch of new book on 'Trust and Ethics in Finance'

 
 

Documents

Inequalites block poverty reduction and economic development, Global Ethics Forum told

Geneva, 28 June 2013: Tackling inequality is central to poverty reduction, economic growth and social development, Sarah Cook, director of the United Nations Research Institute for Social Development, said in a keynote presentation to the Global Ethics Forum 2013 in Geneva in June.

"It's not just part of the development agenda but has to become part of the global agenda," said Cook, presenting the results of a worldwide consultation on addressing inequalities, led by UNICEF (the United Nations Children's Fund) and UN Women.

The theme of the Global Ethics Forum 2013 - attended by decision makers and experts from the private, public, academic and civil society sectors - was "Equal in an Unequal World".  It focussed on the challenge of inequality against the background of global economic, financial, environmental, political and leadership crises.

The 2013 forum was intended as a preparatory gathering for the Global Ethics Forum 2014 in Bangalore, India, the first time the meeting has been held outside Geneva.

Cook noted that inequalities are increasing globally and are the key barrier to poverty reduction. However, they are also an obstacle to growth and economic development, since countries with high levels of inequality tend to grow more slowly.

Moreover, when inequalities overlap they reinforce each other and create unique forms of discrimination and exclusion.

At the same time, through information and communication technologies, inequalities have become more visible and unacceptable and have prompted civil society mobilisation as never before, Cook said.

The UN consultation on addressing inequalities was intended to contribute to the development agenda following the conclusion in 2015 of the UN Millennium Development Goals.

Piecemeal approaches to tackling inequalities are unlikely to succeed, said Cook. There is a need for measures that are not just incremental but transformational and for social and economic approaches to complement each other.

These include universal access to good quality basic goods and services at the national level, a reorientation of monetary and financial policies to encourage greater inclusion of those who are excluded, a better distribution of natural resource incomes, reducing inequalities between countries, which currently accounts for the major part of global economic inequality.

Furthermore, accountability of decision makers and public institutions is an essential feature of just and equitable human progress. While governments can be held accountable only by their own citizens, there need to be global systems to encourage accountability.

In the panel discussion that followed Cook's presentation, Liu Baocheng, the director of the Center for International Business Ethics in Beijing, warned against a focus on equality.

Under communism in the past, he said, "everyone was equal but everyone was equally poor". Absolute equality stifles dynamism, Liu asserted. There should be equal opportunities but not rigid equality everywhere.

Still, China needs to tackle imbalances such those between rural and urban areas, coastal and inland regions, and institutional imbalances between state and private companies, Liu said.

Tayfun Zaman, the director of the Ethics and Reputation Society of Turkey (TIED), noted that gender inequality is a problem for several aspects of Turkish society, while there is an imbalance between major cities and the rest of the country. While business can tackle such inequalities, these problems are not being taken properly into account at the political level.

According to Professor Deon Rossouw, chief executive officer of the Ethics Institute of South Africa, however, economic growth does not necessarily address income inequality. This, he said, is the most divisive factor in South African society and has overtaken race as a key issue in the country.

Rossouw quoted former South African president Nelson Mandela: "To be free is not only to cast off one's chains but to live in a way that enhances and respects the freedom of others."

Rémy Zinder, from the Cantonal Sustainable Development Service of Geneva, described that in Switzerland, gender inequality studies have shown that on average women are paid 20 percent less than men, even for the same job. Women also have less access to administrative boards of  companies.

India is marked by inequality, according to Rajiva Kumar Srivastava, the former executive director of Bharat Electricals Ltd. This can be seen in the case of individuals, corporations, in education and in society at large where the caste system seems resistant to change. A strong sense of ethics and clear policies in the business environment can play a key role not only for companies but the country at large.

The Global Ethics Forum (www.globalethicsforum.org) is a project of the Globethics.net Foundation, a global network that promotes the exchange of insights and research on ethics and values, and whose International Secretariat is based in Geneva.

Addressing Inequalities: Synthesis Report of Global Public Consultation on the Post-2015 Development Agenda: www.worldwewant2015.org/node/299198

 

Plenary Keynote: Dr. Martin Dahinden, Director-General of the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC):
"The Responsibility of Politics, Business and Civil Society for Transformation and Development"

Liink to full documentation from the Global Ethics Forum

 

Global business model needs paradigm shift to embrace values, says corporate governance expert

 
By John Zarocostas
Geneva. Businesses in the 21st century, hit by financial crises, climate change and the need for radical transparency, will survive only if they change their mindset to ensure their operations rest on ethical foundations, says Mervyn King, a former South African supreme court judge.
 
"Responsible business connotes that there must be values. Because to be a responsible business, or business person, you need to be a good corporate citizen," King told participants at the 2012 Global Ethics Forum held in Geneva from 28 to 30 June.
 
The theme of the Forum, attended by 250 decision makers and experts from the private, public, academic and civil society and religious sectors from all continents, was "the value of values in responsible business".
 
The event was organized by Globethics.net, a worldwide network that promotes dialogue and research on ethics and values.
 
In the 21st century it is no longer acceptable for a corporation to turn in a profit at the expense of society and the environment, said King, the co-chair of the Forum.
 
With the natural assets of planet earth being used faster than nature is regenerating, "you can't carry on business as usual. So, you've got to change your whole mindset," noted King, the chairman of the International Integrated Reporting Committee, a group promoting transparency in business reporting.
 
"You can't continue using the tools that you used for decades of looking at shareholder value only. You've got to take account of interests and expectations of all your stakeholders but always for the maximization of total value, which includes the adverse effects the company's model might have on society, and the environment of society on the company," said King.
 
"Unless you are seen by society today as a good corporate citizen, the ultimate compliance officer is not the compliance officer, it's your stakeholders. They're going to flee your company so quickly and not support it."
 
Stakeholder activism is growing, not decreasing, said King. With radical transparency, in large part due to the Internet, people are finding out things they never found out before.
 
In 2008, the concept of short-term capitalism came to an end, said King, a leading world authority on corporate governance. Today the issue is sustainable capitalism, and the concept of ethics, or intellectual honesty, King underlined.
 
"The foundation of leadership must have an ethical foundation, an honest application of mind, getting rid of intellectual baggage, present needs, past experience, and honestly applying your mind in an unbiased manner in the best interests of that entity, in order to sustain value," he stated.
 
On a more positive note, King pointed to companies around the world that are adopting an inclusive approach of considering the needs, interests and expectations of all their stakeholders, and making a decision to sustain the total value of the company.
 
To illustrate the shift, King recalled that the Standard & Poors top 500 companies showed that until 1995 more than 80 percent of the values of the market cap of the leading companies in the world were additives in the balance sheet according to international reporting financial standards.
 
However, more than 80 percent are now not additives in the balance sheet.
 
Instead, "they are made up of the so called non-financial aspects - the reputation of the entity, the quality of governance, the ethics of the leadership, have they applied the principles of responsibility, accountability, fairness and transparency."
 
On the outcome of the recent Rio+20 summit on sustainable development, King had a mixed assessment.
 
"Rio+20 was in my judgement, not a failure. It was a failure by our political representatives. Our political leaders have consistently failed us. We've got no commitment coming out of [Rio+20]. We've had words of encouragement, and acknowledgement as to what should happen, but there's not a 'to do' list," he said.
 
But the real victors coming out of Rio+20, King said, are all of us, the representatives of the private sector, of NGOs, organizations such as Globethics.net.
 
Civil society, the private sector, companies like Procter&Gamble, Unilever, Microsoft, have all changed their business model, he noted.
 
This includes making changes so that their operations are run on renewable energy sources, and re-engineering their products to enable them to use 50 percent less water and 50 percent less energy in consuming them.
 

 

Greater efforts required to 'mainstream' economic and environmental sustainability, concludes 2012 Global Ethics Forum

Geneva. More concerted efforts are required to mainstream economic and environmental sustainability worldwide, Walter Fust, President of the Globethics.net Foundation said in a message at the end of two days of discussion in Geneva at the 2012 Global Ethics Forum.

"Many examples of good and best practices have been presented during this conference. These are the seeds for transformation towards more sustainability, justice and ethical responsibility," he said.

Fust, a former Swiss ambassador, and an eminent authority on international development issues, noted such transformation, requires "continued dialogue, listening and learning and forging robust partnerships".

Globethics.net, with its head office in Geneva, is a worldwide network that promotes dialogue and research on ethics and values, and is the organizer of the Global Ethics Forum.

Many examples of good and best practices, Fust said, were presented during the 28-30 June Forum attended by 250 decision makers and experts from the private, public, academic and civil society and religious sectors from all continents.

But the challenge, Fust said, is how to ensure that some of these ideas become broadly accepted and implemented by business and society at large.

He suggested three aspects could help in these ideas getting wide support.

The first aspect, he outlined, is multi-stakeholder cooperation, the strength of the Global Ethics Forum project and of Globethics.net, with allies across sectors.

Second, is a commitment to ethics; and thirdly an adherence to ethical behaviour.

"The profound transformation needed in the financial sector, business, politics, religious organizations, business schools and so on, shows that ethics can no longer be seen as 'nice to have' in good times and 'not feasible' in bad times. On the contrary: ethics in politics, ethics in business, ethics in education, ethics in media … is mandatory and one key driver for transformation," Fust summed up.

Ibrahim Souss, founding director of the United Arab Emirates-based Institute for Global Dialogue and Peace, said it would be good to integrate ethics in politics, and also in other spheres such as international relations, conflict resolution, post conflict reconstruction, and disaster management.

Germano Badi of the Brazilian Institute for Business Ethics noted that more of the country's top 500 companies in the last few years are implementing, or accepting business codes of ethics, according to surveys.

More initiatives were needed, both in the development of ethical management tools and in ensuring ethics are taught in Universities - required by law - but which has been difficult to implement, said Badi.

Christoph Stückelberger, Executive Director and Founder of Globethics.net, praised the "inclusive approach" of the discussions held during the Forum. He said, "Ethics is not just an issue for professional ethicists or theologians."

World debt and financial crisis 'needs new reserve currency system'

Geneva. There is an urgent need to move away from the dollar as the world's reserve currency, in light of the financial meltdown marked by banking abuse and the ballooning US deficit, the 2012 Global Ethics Forum in Geneva has urged.

"Ethics in finance based on sustainability and justice needs a new reserve currency system," said Christoph Stückelberger, Executive Director and Founder of Globethics.net, a global network that promotes dialogue and research on ethics and values, and the organizer of the 28-30 June Forum.

"A global balanced reserve currency system must reflect the multipolar world and cannot be based on one national currency," said Stückelberger, a professor of ethics.

Experts on finance and business ethics attending the Forum warned of the consequences of maintaining the US dollar as the world reserve currency.

"Paradoxically, the US dollar's status as world reserve currency has exacerbated the US drift towards economic dysfunction," said Thomas A. Myers, a certified US public accountant, and banking expert who is a specialist on securities fraud.

"The essential premise that the US dollar should remain as world reserve currency may no longer be called for," he told 250 international experts, business leaders, and academics attending the 28-30 June gathering.

The global monetary system is "in dire need of reform", Myers said. Any such reform of the global reserve currency system, "must better meet the needs of developed and developing countries in order to bestow the maximum benefits of all citizens of the world".

Myers, who prefers the title "forensic accountant", has testified before the US Congress on banking matters, and provided training to the major banking regulatory agencies, the FBI, the Securities and Exchange Commission, and the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve.

Any currency reform, Myers underlined, needs to be aimed at an economic system that facilitates sustainable and equitable growth through environmentally friendly approaches.

Such a reform, he said, must also be one that "promotes social responsibility and that meets squarely the challenges of global poverty, responsible use of natural resources, and the elimination of the social and economic unrest that leads to conflict".

In a similar vein, Luc Guillory, president of Share France, said the world needs a new international currency, but stressed "it has to reflect something different - equity, justice in the world, and be based on multilateralism".

Experts said the current role of the dollar as the global reserve currency is not helpful to sustainable development, and also indicated it is likely to change in the next five years, thereby leading to significant changes in international trade, aid, politics, and culture.

Therefore, greater ethical leadership to encourage a positive transition is required, said Jem Bendell, a professor of sustainable management, and director and director of Lifeworth Consulting, presenting recommendations from a workshop on the issue.

There needs to be greater clarity about the purpose currency systems should serve, he said.
 
The workshop urged "research and dialogue on first principles and exploring what currency systems at local, national, regional and global level can enable sustainable development".

"There could be a key role for Globethics.net to host that discussion," said Bendell.

Myret Zaki, deputy editor of the Swiss Magazine "Bilan", and author of the bestseller, "The end of the Dollar", pointed out that world trade is already changing the rules of the game "de-facto".

Such changes are taking place, she said, even though the International Monetary Fund and the G20 group of leading economies have not managed to come up with any serious proposals about the future shape of the world's reserve currency systems.

Both Zaki and Chong Zhang, director of Generis Capital in China, believed that the world would increasingly move towards a multi-currency global reserve system.

However, Zaki did not rule out another global financial crisis in the event of the dollar's reserve status being sharply eroded.

 

Global governance cooperation urgent, says top Swiss development official at opening of 2012 Global Ethics Forum

Greater cooperation is necessary by governments, business and civil society to address today's challenges, ranging from environmental degradation to poverty eradication, Switzerland's top development official said at the opening of the 2012 Global Ethics Forum in Geneva.

"The close cooperation of all players … is necessary," Martin Dahinden, director-general of the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC), said in a keynote speech on 28 June.

"We have entered a 'polycentric' world, where local, national, regional and global processes are inseparably linked. In an interconnected world, states make decisions not only for their own people, but for others too," he noted.

"That's why a more pluralistic version of governance is needed which attaches importance not only to nation states, but also to local governments, multilateral agencies, transnational actors, business fora, non-governmental organisations, civil society groups, human rights and advocacy groups."

The 28-30 June Global Ethics Forum (www.globalethicsforum.org) is a project of the Globethics.net Foundation, a global network that promotes the exchange of insights and research on ethics and values, and whose International Secretariat is based in Geneva.

The theme of this year's Forum is: "Seeds for Successful Transformation 2012: The Value of Values in Responsible Business."

In his speech, Dahinden underscored that decoupling human progress from wasteful use of natural resources and environmental degradation "is the challenge of our time".

This challenge is also, he added, one of the crucial sources of success for business.

Overcoming many of today's problems calls for innovation, "not only technical, but also social or institutional innovations,"  Dahinden told 250 international experts, business leaders, and academics attending the Forum.

Dahinden also provided a list of difficulties and risks that are hindering global efforts to find sustainable solutions.

"Disparate prosperity combined with ecological risks, an absence of global sustainability, a lack of governance and resource scarcity, are about to transform the playing field for politics, business and civil society."

He told delegates: "The challenges of climate and environmental change, loss of biodiversity, diseases, food insecurity … require states to act as intermediaries between external and domestic requirements."

On a more optimistic note, Dr. Dahinden provided examples of positive developments and likely possible approaches to achieve a more equitable and sustainable world.

To make international cooperation successful in balancing divergent interests, a dialogue about norms and values "is crucial", he said.

Similarly, partnerships between the private and public sectors and civil society organisations may facilitate "more effective and innovative solutions to global problems".

Turning to business, Dahinden emphasised that taking responsibility and adopting good governance principles are an important means on the way to achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and favouring sustainable development.

This means recognising human rights, upholding environmental and financial standards, he said.

Private companies are also challenged, said Dr. Dahinden, to promote "sustainability aspects throughout their portfolio of activities rather than limiting themselves to promoting philanthropic activities besides their main business".  

Finally, "the prosperous countries are challenged to focus attention on the point where risks, poverty, vulnerability and loss of dignity meet," the Swiss official said in remarks aimed at advanced economies.

"Only by changing the 'pattern of thinking' can rights and responsibilities be negotiated with reference to the overall global common good. A management of global risks which runs counter to the attempts to fight poverty cannot build the coalition needed to succeed."

Full text of speech by Dr. Martin Dahinden
 

Launch of new book on 'Trust and Ethics in Finance'


Amid continuing global financial instability, a new book, Trust and Ethics in Finance, launched in Geneva on 28 June by Globethics.net contains insights from young researchers on six continents to promote ethics and integrity in the finance sector.
 
The 23 contributions to the book represent the best and most innovative papers submitted for the Ethics in Finance-Robin Cosgrove Prize, an award launched in 2006 and named after a young investment banker who lost his life in an accident in the Alps.

"The papers are both timely and perceptive," co-editor Dr. Carol Cosgrove-Sacks said at the book launch during the Global Ethics Forum in Geneva. "They indicate both the astute grasp of the young authors and the continuing lack of resolution of the issues relating to integrity, trust and ethical behaviour in the world of finance."

The papers, by young professionals coming from all parts of the world from Argentina to Zimbabwe, are gathered in three main sections: ethics in finance beyond compliance; standards and values; and solidarity and sustainability.

"One of the themes that emerge repeatedly throughout the essays in this book is the economic and social value of trust, whether in economies, markets or corporations," Financial Times senior columnist John Plender writes in a preface to the book.

"The recent protests against capitalism and inequality in New York, London and elsewhere have underlined the public dissatisfaction with the response to the financial crisis," Plender notes. "We have learned from experience that it is not possible to regulate people into good behaviour. In that sense, the Robin Cosgrove essays are an alternative agenda."

The Robin Cosgrove Prize is organized and managed under the supervision of Dr. Carol Cosgrove-Sacks, Robin's mother, and the Observatoire de la Finance (Geneva), whose director, Paul H. Dembinski, is the co-editor of Trust and Ethics in Finance. It is aimed at young professionals under 35.

"Even though the vital importance of the financial markets is recognised, the number of publications on ethics in finance is very limited," said Prof. Dr. Christoph Stückelberger, Executive Director and Founder of Globethics.net at the book launch on 28 June.

"The Robin Cosgrove prize is so important and innovative because it stimulates and supports this redirection of financial markets," said Stückelberger.

Globethics.net is a global network with its head office in Geneva that promotes the exchange of insights and research on ethics and values

It is the organizer of the Global Ethics Forum, meeting 28-30 June in Geneva to chart steps towards an "ethical transformation" in business and politics amid global economic turbulence.

Trust and Ethics in Finance: Innovative Ideas from the Robin Cosgrove Prize, edited by Carol Cosgrove-Sacks and Paul H. Dembinski, published by Globethics.net, 400pp.

Copies may be downloaded free of charge from www.globethics.net/web/ge/research/publications

Print copies are available for CHF/USD 13 (South) or 25 (North), plus postage, from
infoweb@globethics.net or info@robincosgroveprize.org

 

2012 Global Ethics Forum in Geneva to focus on
debt crisis, Rio +20, ethical finance, business ethics


Geneva. Business, political, civil society and academic leaders will gather at the 2012 Global Ethics Forum in Geneva from 28 – 30 June to chart steps to promote an "ethical transformation" in business and politics amid global economic turbulence.

"The current crisis-ridden and conflictual period in world history shows that fundamental transformation in the economy, business, politics, civil society and culture is happening and is needed," said Professor Dr. Christoph Stückelberger, the Executive Director and Founder of Globethics.net, the organizer of the three-day forum (www.globalethicsforum.org).

The theme of the 2012 Global Ethics Forum is: " Seeds for Successful Transformation 2012: The Value of Values in Responsible Business."

The forum includes plenary sessions, workshops and interview panels with more than 70 international experts and business leaders.

The opening keynote speaker is Martin Dahinden, Director-General of the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation. He will focus on the responsibility of politics, business and civil society for transformation and development.

The forum gathers a few days after the Rio +20 summit on sustainable development and a key issue for discussion in Geneva will be on steps towards "Managing the Sustainability Crisis". Issues for the Global Ethics Forum include new accountability mechanisms to support ethical transformation, and measures to promote a green economy and "post-fuel" business operations.

Another key issue for the forum is "Managing the Debt Crisis", amid a global economy too heavily influenced by crisis-ridden financial markets and indebtedness.

Speakers and other leading participants from all continents include:
• S.D. Shibulal, CEO and Co-Founder, Infosys, Co-Chair Global Ethics Forum
(India)
• Mervyn King, Judge, Chair of the International Integrated Reporting Council (IIRC), Co-
Chair Global Ethics Forum (UK/South Africa)
• Antonio Usama DeLorenzo, Associate Partner, Presidium LLP (United Arab Emirates),
former regulator with the Securities Commission Malaysia on Islamic Banking
• Anwar Hashmi, Senior Manager – Ethics, Tata Steel (India)
• Myret Zaki, Deputy Editor in Chief of the magazine "Bilan", Geneva
• Nathalie Labourdette, Head of the Media Academy, European Broadcasting Union (EBU)

Three sets of interview panels will allow companies, public sector representatives and NGOs to share experiences and best practices about successful ethical transformation to improve their governance and operations, and their social, environmental and economic impacts.

The Global Ethics Forum is not a one-off annual meeting but part of a process that includes research, exchange in online workgroups, and online documentation and publication.

The 2012 event builds on the 2011 Global Ethics Forum, which identified key issues to be addressed in developing responsible business ethics in a rapidly changing world. The 2012 forum will draw up proposals for specific steps to promote ethical transformation, based on the results of 12 workgroups set up after the 2011 event.

The Globethics.net Foundation is a global network that promotes the exchange of insights and research on ethics and values between experts, institutions, and individuals, and whose International Secretariat is based in Geneva.

Media enquiries to Stephen Brown +41 22 791 6342 (office) +41 78 639 2905 (mobile)
Email: brown@globethics.net

Notes for editors:
The 2012 Global Ethics Forum takes place at the International Conference Centre Geneva, 17 rue de Varembé, Geneva.

The programme including the full list of speakers is available at:
www.globalethicsforum.org

The forum is open to media. Journalists are requested to register online using the registration form available at: www.globalethicsforum.org


Globethics.net is a global online network of more than 55'000 individuals, and of institutions from all sectors of society, with participants from more than 200 countries. It has a special focus on business ethics, responsible leadership and Interreligious ethics.
Globethics.net strengthens ethical dialogue, reflection and action on a global level and with a special focus on emerging and developing countries by:
• providing access to knowledge resources on ethics through its flagship global digital libraries, with more than one million full-text documents, specialized collections, research tools, corporate social responsibility news, and other services;
•facilitating networking on ethics between registered participants and organizations; and
•stimulating international collaborative research and training in selected fields, using online
workgroups, publications, conferences and training.

 

 

2012 Global Ethics Forum in Geneva to focus on
ethical transformation in politics, business and society


Geneva. Leaders and experts from business, government, civil society and academic institutions will gather at the 2012 Global Ethics Forum in Geneva from 28 – 30 June to set out steps to promote an ethical transformation in politics, business and society.

Registration is now open for the three-day event, which includes plenary sessions, workshops and interview panels with more than 70 business leaders and international experts.

The theme of the 2012 Global Ethics Forum is: " Seeds for Successful Transformation 2012: The Value of Values in Responsible Business."

"The current crises show that fundamental transformation in the economy, business, politics, civil society and culture is happening and is needed," said Professor Dr. Christoph Stückelberger, the Executive Director and Founder of Globethics.net, the organizer of the forum.

"We are seeking to plant 'seeds for successful transformation' in companies and institutions that could benefit from concrete value-based changes in their culture and practice," he stated.

Issues to be addressed at the 2012 Global Ethics Forum include:
• The responsibility of politics, business and civil society for transformation and development
• Financial transformation towards an ethical economy following the debt crisis
• The next steps to deal with the climate crisis after the Rio+20 meeting in Brazil

The Global Ethics Forum is not a one-off annual meeting but part of a three-year project (2011-2013) involving research, exchange in online workgroups, and online documentation and publication.

The 2012 event builds on the 2011 Global Ethics Forum, which identified key issues to be addressed in developing responsible business ethics in a rapidly changing world. The 2012 forum will draw up proposals for specific steps to promote ethical transformation, based on the results of 12 workgroups set up after the 2011 event.

The Globethics.net Foundation is a global network that promotes the exchange of insights and research on ethics and values between experts, institutions, and individuals, and whose International Secretariat is based in Geneva.

Media enquiries to Stephen Brown +41 22 791 6342 (office) +41 78 639 2905 (mobile)
Email: brown@globethics.net


Notes for editors:
The 2012 Global Ethics Forum takes place at the International Conference Centre Geneva, 17 rue de Varembé, Geneva.

The forum is open to media. Journalists are requested to register online at:
www.globethics.net/web/gef/registration-form

The full programme is available at: www.globethics.net/web/gef/programme1
More information about speakers at: www.globethics.net/web/gef/speakers-info2

 


Globethics.net is a global online network of 45'000 individuals and 140 institutions from all sectors of society and from more than 200 countries. It has a special focus on business ethics, responsible leadership and Interreligious ethics.

Globethics.net strengthens ethical dialogue, reflection and action on a global level and with a special focus on emerging and developing countries by:
• providing access to knowledge resources on ethics through its flagship global digital libraries, with more than one million full-text documents, specialized collections, research tools, corporate social responsibility news, and other services;
•facilitating networking on ethics between registered participants and organizations; and
•stimulating international collaborative research and training in selected fields, using online workgroups, publications, conferences and training.